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Alistair McNaught

Alistair has over 20 years teaching experience and has been involved in using e-learning in mainstream teaching (and supporting staff in doing the same) since the mid 1990s. He worked as ILT co-ordinator at Peter Symonds' College, contributing to a wide range of subject based projects including a major external project with the National Museum of Science and Industry. He worked for many years as a freelance author both in his subject area (earth sciences) and e-learning.
 
His main interests lie in (i) the use of e-learning to accommodate a range of learning needs (ii) providing teachers with the tools, techniques and confidence to provide flexible, adaptable learning experiences for their students (iii) helping develop pragmatic pedagogically sound approaches to the use of e-learning in supporting all learners, particularly disabled learners.
 
A keen amateur photographer and poet, he maintains an “arty blog” at www.wordcurious.blogspot.com


For discussion

“Visual” – solution, problem or catalyst? Learning from the learner’s experience.

The Art, Design and Media world is familiar with paradigm shifts where a new way of looking at things suddenly nurtures creative possibilities that had not been seen before. As technologies for teaching and learning evolve, the possibilities of more inclusive approaches to content delivery, skills development and assessment begin to multiply.

This session will consider how technologies can support learners with primarily visual learning preferences. From highly portable hardware such as Mimio boards to freely downloadable software such as Camstudio and Wink, learning resources can be transformed, bringing particular benefits to dyslexic learners. But are the Arts automatically visual? How do we knock down barriers without erecting new ones in their place? There will be a mix of online presentation, sample resources, technology tools and lively debate to explore new opportunities for inclusive practice that might just inspire some new experimentation...

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